7.26.11
7.25.11
7.25.11
7.25.11

(Source: shikseh, via mr-anxiety)

7.24.11
“ Telling a guy the real reasons you’re not interested — you don’t find him attractive, he’s way too old for you, you get a distinctly creepy vibe off him, whatever — or offering no explanation at all, because you just met this guy and owe him nothing, would be “rude.” And thanks to the conditioning Harriet describes, exhibiting the slightest hint of “rudeness” to any stranger who approaches you with sex on his mind makes you feel not like a normal human being with healthy boundaries, but a mean, frigid, stuck-up bitch. Worse yet, sometimes, the same man who called you beautiful and offered to buy you a drink ten seconds ago will turn aggressive when you say you’re not interested; he’ll tell you flat out you’re a bitch, or a whore, or less printable things. He’ll reject your rejection by getting in your face and losing his temper. So really, it’s a lot safer and simpler to say, “Look, you’re a nice guy, but no thanks/I have a boyfriend/I can’t.” ”

No more Mr. Nice Guy

A good introduction to the issue of why women should not be socialized to apologize for the right to personal space, and instead be taught to firmly assert that right. (via ponymalta)

I had a guy ask me why I didn’t just tell this really annoying sleazy guy to blatantly fuck off, why I kept being “nice,” and I told him “because I don’t want to be assaulted.” (via andeventhis)(via faithandbegorrah)(via katoleary)(via lfar)

I can’t help but be reminded of this, particularly the closing lines. How are guys not aware that this is what some men are like? (via missworld, ax55tc42s) (via damesyllabust) (via randtm)

I had to tell the same guy on THREE separate occasions that “it’s not a good idea” until I finally resorted to “I am not interested and you need to stop harassing me or I’m going to HR.”  I should’ve just started with that, but I didn’t want to ‘hurt his feelings.’  God, society. (via jumblejo)

(via squee-gee)

(via feministslut) (via theworldsgotmedizzyagain)

7.23.11
7.23.11
7.23.11

(Source: sootsprite)

7.22.11
“ I’m sick to the back teeth, sick and tired, of feminists being accused of sexism and hypocrisy unless we spend exactly half of our time and resources pointing out every instance of how ‘patriarchy hurts men too’. Gay rights activists aren’t expected to spend half their time campaigning for heterosexuals. Anti-racism activists aren’t expected to spend ages campaigning on behalf of white people. Yet it’s a different story with feminism, isn’t it? …
… It’s why people say things like ‘I’m not a feminist, I’m a humanist’ or ‘I’m not a feminist, I’m in favour of human rights’. It’s because there is a stigma attached to any activism that unashamedly benefits women, as a social group. It’s not seen as worthy enough, and fighting on behalf of women as a group is embarassing somehow. I’m just talking about plain, uncontroversial activism that improves the lives of women…
…At the end of the day, there are feminists who concentrate on men’s issues, some who do work on both genders, and some who concentrate solely on improving the world for women. All are useful aspects of feminism. All have validity, and none of them should have to apologise for their focus…” —Catherine Redfern ”
7.22.11

(Source: laughinghuman)

7.22.11
7.21.11
7.21.11
womenaresociety:

 
What Exactly Do We Have To Do For You To Watch Women’s Soccer?According to three members of France’s womens’ soccer team, Gaetine Thiney, Elodie Thomis and Corine Franco, it’s probably–show up naked. In a risky move, all three players posed nude for a German magazine to generate some discussion around why people aren’t as interested as they should be in women’s soccer. The image, while so obviously sexual, is made interesting with the caption, “Is this how we should show up before you come to our games?”
Most people are missing the point, arguing that these women are using sex to garner more viewership. And while on one level that might be true, it is really the controversy around using the image that is being used for more attention–a decidedly political move. These women are directly interrogating the reality that you have to use sex to get men interested in women’s, well, anything. (In contrast, a few members of the German women’s soccer team have posed for Playboy, but without the accompanying commentary).
This, to me, is a smart media moment. They are directly challenging the sad, but often true, media conditions wherein women aren’t paid attention to in an entertainment capacity unless they are sex objects. And while enthusiasm is building around women’s soccer, we’ve got a long way to go before it is a respected household tradition the same way men’s soccer or other sports might be (at least in the US).

At the gym someone left the tv on in front of the treadmill I stepped onto and there was the France vs. Sweden game on. I have never ever had an interest in soccer before, but it kept my attention to the point where I enjoyed it and didn’t just turn the tv off (which I usually do because I am listening to my ipod). I can’t see myself sitting still and watching it at home yet, but that may change.

womenaresociety:

What Exactly Do We Have To Do For You To Watch Women’s Soccer?

According to three members of France’s womens’ soccer team, Gaetine Thiney, Elodie Thomis and Corine Franco, it’s probably–show up naked. In a risky move, all three players posed nude for a German magazine to generate some discussion around why people aren’t as interested as they should be in women’s soccer. The image, while so obviously sexual, is made interesting with the caption, “Is this how we should show up before you come to our games?”

Most people are missing the point, arguing that these women are using sex to garner more viewership. And while on one level that might be true, it is really the controversy around using the image that is being used for more attention–a decidedly political move. These women are directly interrogating the reality that you have to use sex to get men interested in women’s, well, anything. (In contrast, a few members of the German women’s soccer team have posed for Playboy, but without the accompanying commentary).

This, to me, is a smart media moment. They are directly challenging the sad, but often true, media conditions wherein women aren’t paid attention to in an entertainment capacity unless they are sex objects. And while enthusiasm is building around women’s soccer, we’ve got a long way to go before it is a respected household tradition the same way men’s soccer or other sports might be (at least in the US).

At the gym someone left the tv on in front of the treadmill I stepped onto and there was the France vs. Sweden game on. I have never ever had an interest in soccer before, but it kept my attention to the point where I enjoyed it and didn’t just turn the tv off (which I usually do because I am listening to my ipod). I can’t see myself sitting still and watching it at home yet, but that may change.

7.21.11
7.20.11
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